Last blog post: One Final Tip For Improving Your Chinese Language Skills With Yoyochinese.com

Last blog post: One Final Tip For Improving Your Chinese Language Skills With Yoyochinese.com

Hi everyone, this is going to be my final blog post for my media campaign. It has been a very long and arduous adventure for me to keep you engaged through Facebook and Twitter for the last 2 months. Thank you to those who has boarded my ship from the beginning and has been through this long journey together with me. Thank you for supporting me all this time. Reflecting to my first ever blog post, I said that:

“I believe that with that goal in mind, it will motivate me to study harder in order to achieve my goal. Goal = Motivation = Increase in language skills and culture”

Till this day, I still believe that by wanting to watch all of those un-subbed Chinese TV series, I have been motivated to study Mandarin. I can proudly say that, today marks the day that I have finally completed 2 years of Chinese for non-background speakers at the University of New South Wales in Australia.

In this last post, I would like to recommend a website where you can start to learn the basics of Chinese from.

Yoyochinese.com has been established for 8 eight years helping over Continue reading “Last blog post: One Final Tip For Improving Your Chinese Language Skills With Yoyochinese.com”

The Four Great Folktales (中国四大民间传说) In Live Action Part 2

The Four Great Folktales (中国四大民间传说) In Live Action Part 2

Continuing on from my previous post, this post is about the other two of The Four Great Folktales (中国四大民间传说), which are the Cowherd and the Weaving Maid and Lady Meng Jiang.

So far we have looked at from The Four Greats Series:

  • The Four Ancient Beauties of China (中国古代四大美女) Part 1, Part 2
  • The Four Great Classical Novels (中国古代四大名著) Part 1, Part 2
  • The Four Great Folktales (中国四大民间传说) Part 1

Lets see which folklore has the saddest love story.

Cowherd and the Weaving Maid (牛郎织女) and Tian Xian Pei (天仙配)

Both of these stories talk about the forbidden love between the 7th Princess, the daughter of the Jade Emperor and a mortal. In the story of the Cowherd and the Weaving Maid, both characters were heavenly stars who got separated because Continue reading “The Four Great Folktales (中国四大民间传说) In Live Action Part 2”

The Four Great Folktales (中国四大民间传说) In Live Action Part 1

The Four Great Folktales (中国四大民间传说) In Live Action Part 1

Hi everyone, welcome back to another series of The Four Greats (中国四大) in Ancient China. In this last series I would like to talk about two of the The Four Great Folktales (中国四大民间传说), The Butterfly Lovers and the Legend of the White Snake. Lets find out what these folktales are about?

The Butterfly Lovers (梁山伯与祝英台)

Zhu Yingtai is the ninth child and only daughter of the wealthy Zhu family. Thus, she is often referred to as the Ninth Sister (九妹). After several attempts at persuading her father, Zhu eventually persuades her father to allow her to attend literature classes as a man. There is an expression used to describe this:

女扮男装 - Nǚ bàn nánzhuāng - A woman disguised as a man

Now with her new identity, on her way to class she meets up with Continue reading “The Four Great Folktales (中国四大民间传说) In Live Action Part 1”

The Four Great Classical Novels (中国古代四大名著) In Live Action Part 2

The Four Great Classical Novels (中国古代四大名著) In Live Action Part 2

I hope that you have enjoyed reading about my previous blog post about the Water Margin and Romance Of The Three Kingdoms. This post will continue about the other two of China’s Four Great Classical Novels, one of which is Wu Cheng’en‘s Journey To The West and the other is Cao Xueqin‘s Dream Of The Red Chamber.

Journey to the West (西游记)

Journey to the west is based on Xuanzang‘s own account of Great Tang Records on the Western Regions. The author had also added in elements of fantasy and folklores into this story. He created that Buddha gave the task of gathering scriptures in the west to Xuanzang with his three disciples who agree to help him as an atonement for their sins. These disciples are Wukong, Zhu BajieSha Wujing and the White Dragon Horse who acts as Xuanzang’s steed.

You would get to see and hear briefly about different myths and folklore such as Chang’e, The Cowherd and Weaver Girl, The Seven Fairies and The Butterfly Lovers that has been incorporated in the novel.

I have grown up watching Journey To The West and it has become one of my favourite story ever. Every time that I think back to this series I would remember Bajie’s favourite line:

问苍天 爱是何物 – Wèn cāngtiān Ài shì hé wù – Asking Heaven, what is love?

Continue reading “The Four Great Classical Novels (中国古代四大名著) In Live Action Part 2”

The Four Great Classical Novels (中国古代四大名著) In Live Action Part 1

The Four Great Classical Novels (中国古代四大名著) In Live Action Part 1

In this post I would like to talk about two of China’s Four Great Classical Novels, one of which is Shi Nai’an‘s Water Margin and the other is Luo Guanzhong‘s Romance Of The Three Kingdoms. These novels are considered as gems toward the Chinese. I heard from a Chinese friend that she had to read and learn about these novels during her high school days. Similarly, us Australian students had to learn about William Shakespeare during high school. Lets find out how great these works of literature were!

Water Margin (水浒传)

Wu_Song_Water_Margin
Wu Song Slaying The Tiger (Source: Wikimedia)

For me, I am not too familiar with this novel but I do know of Wu Song‘s story. You might have heard of Wu Song’s heroic feat of slaying the tiger very often in Chinese TV series. He is one of the 36 Heroes of the Marsh. Wu Song also appears in the novel The Plum In The Golden Vase (金瓶梅). In this story to avenge the death of his brother Wu Dalang, he

Continue reading “The Four Great Classical Novels (中国古代四大名著) In Live Action Part 1”

Famous Wuxia Novelists: Jin Yong (金庸), Gu Long (古龙), Liang Yusheng (梁羽生), Huang Yi (黄易) & Wen Rui An (溫瑞安)

Famous Wuxia Novelists: Jin Yong (金庸), Gu Long (古龙), Liang Yusheng (梁羽生), Huang Yi (黄易) & Wen Rui An (溫瑞安)

In my one of my previous blog posts, I have written that I love TV series with a wuxia setting. This has made me more and more interested in Chinese history and culture. Therefore, I started to learn Chinese in order to watch other series that don’t get English subtitled. For the past few years I have watched an array of series from various time periods set in ancient China and have gotten to know its culture and history. I believe that my theory is becoming true:

Goal = Motivation = Increase in language skills and culture

Now I would like to introduce to you the what “wuxia (武俠)” means. Wuxia refers to a genre of Chinese literature that involves martial arts heroes. Generally the protagonist is a male who knows little or no martial arts skills at the beginning of the story. The protagonist then travels around jianghu (江湖 – martial arts realm), making friends and of course enemies. Throughout his journeys he will be having many girls chasing after him or sometimes he does the chasing. Through various trials and tribulations he will learn the ultimate martial arts skills that no body else in wulin (武林 – martial arts community) can defeat and sometimes he will become the wulin mengzhu (武林盟主 – martial arts leader). Lets find out about the most famous novelists in Chinese literature that popularised the wuxia genre.

Read about these famous stories with English translations at Wuxiasociety. Or you can watch these series with English subtitles below:

Continue reading “Famous Wuxia Novelists: Jin Yong (金庸), Gu Long (古龙), Liang Yusheng (梁羽生), Huang Yi (黄易) & Wen Rui An (溫瑞安)”